New Bread Mixes now at C&J Farms!

We now offer a variety of Sugar free, gluten free, dairy free, keto & vegan friendly, bread mixes! You can purchase these on-line, or in-store. We are enjoying eating clean & guilt free, are you?!

No Sugar Aloud bread mix is a superfood designed to make you feel good and help you in the process of reducing simple carbs and sugar from you diet. Only the best ingredients are used. These bread mixes are mixed by hand, by a chef in small batches to achieve consistency in every single bag. Why? Because you deserve it. Enjoy all the benefits of quitting sugar from your diet.

Click here to order your bread mixes today!

Our business hours have changed!

We have changed our hours of operation! We are excited to announce that we will now be open on Sundays, and later throughout the week! We hope this makes it easier to come out and see us for all your seasonings, local honey, produce, and other goodie needs!

Sunday- 11-6,

Monday- Closed

Tuesday- 9-4

Wednesday 9-6

Thursday- 9-6

Friday- 9-6

Saturday- 10-6

Located at 8621 S. US HWY 287, Corsicana, Tx. (Mildred/Eureka area) We’ve got yellow signs out front, beautiful flowers in the gardens, and a bright yellow door, so you can’t miss us! If you have any questions, give us a call at 903-875-1798. We hope to see you all soon!

Fresh Produce Box

Each week we pick up produce (as locally as possible), and create a ‘Produce Box’! We offer a little bit of everything in each and box, and boxes may be different each week! You can always come in and pick out any of the produce, you don’t have to just purchase a produce box. If you like the simplicity of it though, swing by the store and we’ll quickly put one together for you (Located at 8621 S. US HWY 287, Corsicana (Mildred/Eureka area)). We also do local deliveries for FREE!! All you have to do is call us at 903-875-1798 to place and pay for an order of $20 or more, and as long as you live within 25 miles of us we’ll deliver it that day to you! We deliver to Mildred/Eureka, Corsicana, Dawson, Kerens, and the surrounding area. This week’s produce box is listed below. All this for only $25!

2 Cara Cara Oranges

1 Bunch blueberries

1 Bunch blackberries

3 Plums

1 LB Red Seedless Grapes

1 Cantaloupe

1 Avocado

4 Corn

1 Cucumber

2 Tomatoes

2LB Yukon Potatoes

And 1 Red or Yellow Bell Pepper

*While Supplies last. If there’s something you would like to substitute just let us know!

Fertilizing with items from home/free.

Natural and Mostly Free Fertilizers

It’s Spring so we have a lot of garden work to do.  During the winter months, I was thinking about gardening, of course.  I began to research How to Fertilize your garden naturally and found a lot of good information.  Growing our herbs and veggies as naturally and organically as possible is what many of us want.  This might help you too.

Plants need three things to survive and thrive: Potassium, Phosphorus, and Nitrogen. While store bought chemical fertilizers typically have these nutrients, you can also provide them to your plants without the harsh chemicals by just making them yourself, and most of them can be made with things that you already have on hand and will probably just throw out.

There are many different all-natural fertilizers that you can use in your garden or with potting soil. Some of these fertilizers can be made or collected at home using common items from your pantry or your backyard. 

So here we go…..

1. Grass Clippings

If you haven’t had chemicals on your lawn you can collect your grass clippings to use on your gardens. Half an inch to an inch of grass clippings makes a great weed-blocking mulch, and it is also rich in nitrogen, which is an essential nutrient for most plants.

You can also add clippings to your compost pile.

Composting involves mixing grass clippings and other plant materials with a small amount of soil containing microorganisms that decompose organic matter. Grass clippings are excellent additions to a compost pile because of their high nitrogen content.

Grass clippings should not be the only compost material. As with mulches, a thick layer of grass clippings in a compost pile will lead to bad odors from anaerobic decomposition. Mix them with dry materials such as leaves or straw.

2. Weeds

Just like grass clippings, many of the weeds that you’ll find in your gardens are very high in nitrogen and will make an excellent fertilizer. The problem is, once you’ve pulled the weeds, you certainly won’t want to put them back in the garden because any seeds will sprout and make new weeds. The solution? Make weed tea. To do this, fill a five-gallon bucket no more than 1/4 full with weeds that you’ve pulled. Then fill the bucket the rest of the way with water, and let the weeds soak for a week or two. Once the water turns nice and brown (like tea), pour this weed tea on your gardens.

3. Kitchen Scraps

Put your kitchen scraps to work.  I keep a baggie (there are commercial scrap holders on the market) and put my veggie and fruit wastes in the baggie.  I typically have a mesh cone in my raised beds to add the kitchen scraps to regularly.  They decompose adding nutrients constantly.

4. Manure

This is one of my favorites.  Sometimes we have available manure on the farm, but I have also purchased rabbit manure in bulk from breeders.  You can find manure for sale. The rabbit manure is not hot. So this can be used immediately.

Manure comes from a variety of sources — cows, horses, chickens, and even bats. Each type of manure is high in nitrogen and other nutrients, but you’ll need to use it carefully. Raw manure is highly acidic and may have more nutrients than your plants need, so too much can burn your plants. It’s best to use composted manure. Since it is less nutrient-dense and acidic, you can use more of it to improve your soil’s water retention without risking your plants. You won’t have to wait long—manure quickly turns to a perfect odor-free soil amendment.

Manure has been used for centuries as well for fertilizing and you can use manure from any farm animal that you may have. If you don’t have farm animals, your neighbors will probably be glad to give you some manure from their animals. You can make a manure tea.  You’ll want a shovel full and the manure should be pretty well aged, so nothing from the same day that you plan to make the tea. Put the manure in a pillowcase or burlap sack and then soak the bag in a five gallon bucket of water for about two weeks. Just dilute the tea with water by half and use it to water your plants. Not only does this help to add essential nutrients, you also get the benefits of manure without actually having to smell fresh manure on your plants.

5. Tree Leaves

Rather than bagging up the fall leaves and putting them out on your curb, collect them for your gardens instead. Leaves are rich with trace minerals, they attract earthworms, they retain moisture, and they’ll help make heavy soils lighter. You can use leaves in two ways: Either till them into your soil (or mix crushed leaves into potting soil), or use them as a mulch to both fertilize your plants and keep weeds down.

In our gardens I always let the leaves from the fall stay in my gardens until spring.  They are the perfect mulch protector over the winter.

6. Coffee Grounds – adds nitrogen adding acidity to the soil

Lots of plants, such as blueberries, rhododendron, roses, and tomatoes, thrive best in acidic soil. Here are other plants that will benefit – veggies, hydrangea, magnolias. Recycle your coffee grounds to help acidify your soil. There are a couple of ways to do this— you can either top dress by sprinkling the used grounds over the surface of the soil this will perk those plants right up. or you can make “coffee” or “coffee tea” to pour on your gardens. Soak up to six cups of used coffee grounds for up to a week to make garden coffee, then use it to water your acid-loving plants.

7. Eggshells

If you’ve ever used lime on your garden, then you know it comes with lots of benefits —  it helps  lower the acidity of soil for plants that don’t like acid, and it provides plants with lots of calcium, which is an essential nutrient. Lime itself is an all-natural fertilizer that you can buy at the garden center, but if you’d rather save some money, there is a cheaper way to get the same benefits. Simply wash out the eggshells from your kitchen, save them, and crush them to use in your garden. It turns out that eggshells are 93% calcium carbonate, which is the scientific name for lime.

The shells contain a lot of calcium which helps with cellular growth in your plants. Calcium deficient soil can lead to blossom end rot on tomatoes and various other garden catastrophes. This egg shell fertilizer will help to end that. Just crush up used egg shells and then bury them in the soil. Or, you can make a spray with egg shells and a gallon of water. Boil the shells in the water for just a few minutes and then leave overnight. Strain the shells and add the water to a spray bottle to spray directly onto your soil.

8. Banana Peels

We eat bananas for their potassium, and roses love potassium too. Simply bury peels in a hole alongside the rose bush so they can compost naturally. As the rose grows, bury the peels into the soil’s top layer. Both of these approaches will provide much-needed potassium for the plant’s proper growth

We all know that bananas are rich in potassium. They also contain calcium and phosphorous and are perfect for fertilizing flowering plants, fruit trees and plants. You can just bury banana peels in the soil at the base of your plants and allow them to decompose. You could also freeze your overripe bananas and then bury those next to your plants. Or, make a spray by soaking banana peels in water for three days and then spray your plants or seedlings to add the needed nutrients. This is also a great recipe for houseplants.

9. Comfrey

What is brilliant about comfrey is that it contains high levels of all the essential nutrients for plant growth: Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium (NPK) together with many other trace elements.  Comfrey out-performs manure, compost and many liquid feeds for concentration of nutrients.  It produces these from a deep root system extending right into the subsoil that most edible plants cannot access.  It also has an ideal Carbon:Nitrogen ratio which means that it does not hamper absorption of nitrogen by plants. When cutting comfrey it is advisable to use gloves as the hairs on the stems can irritate skin.

There are many great ways to use comfrey around the garden:

  • Mulch: Leaves can be cut and left to wilt for a couple of days before piling them around hungry plants such as potatoes and tomatoes as a thick mulch.
  • Dig in: Wilted leaves can be dug into ground that is being prepared for a new crop and will break down to give an excellent feed.
  • Liquid Fertilizer: Comfrey leaves can be crammed into a large container with a hole in the bottom with a small container underneath to catch the thick black liquid which will be produced in a few weeks.  Weighing the comfrey down with an old brick will help this process and some people add rainwater but this does make the resulting ‘comfrey tea’ smell awful!  Once produced, the liquid should be diluted 15:1 with water before using it as a leaf feed for plants such as tomatoes.
  •   Potting Soil: Comfrey leaves can be shredded and mixed with leaf-mold to produce a balanced soil for plants in pots, although it is a little strong for young seedlings.
  •   Compost Activator: Adding high-nitrogen sources is a great way to boost ‘hot-composting’ if you have the right balance of green and brown shredded material.  Comfrey, being high in nitrogen, is ideal for this and should be well combined with the whole mixture rather than adding it as a layer.

I grow comfrey, which is a beautiful perennial plant with lovely flowers, and always use the waste from the dead leaves in the fall in my gardens.  The medicinal benefits are fantastic too!

10. Epsom Salt

If you prefer something a bit simple you can mix Epsom Salt with water for a good fertilizer, too. You can find Epsom salt at many stores and it’s really inexpensive. It’s also a great source of magnesium and sulfur and is especially good for roses and tomatoes. This is a no-fail fertilizer. You just can’t get this one wrong. Just add a tablespoon of salt to a gallon of water and use this to feed your indoor and outdoor plants.

11. Aquarium Water

Aquarium water contains (obviously) fish waste from the bottom of the tank, which makes a great plant fertilizer. So instead of throwing that water out the backdoor when you’re cleaning your aquarium, give it to your garden plants. Just be sure you use “fresh” water and not water from a saltwater tank. That would be BAD…really bad. Also be aware of the smell and stick to using this on your ornamental outdoor plants. For veggie gardeners willing to spend a small amount, there’s a commercial product called fish emulsion that’s extremely effective and affordable as well. Then again, you could always go fishing! Another favorite of mine!! I do use the fish emulsion and have great success.

12. Wood Ash

Wood ash from fireplaces makes a great plant food on the cheap. Wood ashes contain potassium and calcium carbonate so it would make a nice option, which you can apply by simply having it sprinkled onto your soil. Just be sure the ashes that you’ll be using have no charcoal or lighter fluid which can be harmful to your plants. Fireplace ash fertilizer can even jolt your grass back to life. If you have a few spots dying out, simply apply a small bit.

The Un Neatness of it All

It is Fall. Here in Texas the weather this year is untypically Fall like. Cool nights in the 50’s with highs in the mid to low 70’s, enjoyable and unusual for us.  Typically, the temperatures go from HOT to cold without much in between, like fall weather.

My garden beds have been in great need of cleaning out for a couple of months now. (I like a clean and tidy house.  I also like my beds and yard to be neat and tidy.)  When I let the clean out of the gardens go (like I have for months) it feels untidy and like I need to clean house.  So, with the help of my husband we set out to clean out some garden beds.

I started in the round garden bed that is directly in front of the porch we sit on every day.  We enjoy sitting on the porch chatting at the end of our day, relaxing.  This round bed was atrocious. Grass was 2 feet high overwhelming the mint that was trying to come back now that the weather has cooled off. I was pulling and digging out the roots that run underground.  We trimmed hedges, cleaned out weeds, raked, pulled and picked up for hours.

As I was cleaning the round bed I began to wonder “Can there be beauty or calm in the un neatness of it all?” The un neatness of it all……. 

As I was looking at the tall grass I was pulling and tossing to the side; I saw some light colored fuzzy soft looking ends on some of the grass. I became curious and had to take a break and see if I could work some of that fuzzy soft looking grass heads out away from the other burn pile bound stack of garden debris.

Someone described me as tenacious one time and I have to say, that I am.  I sat on the damp ground and carefully worked out the grass heads and stems until I had a small pile of them.  Taken away from all of the other un neatness, I thought these were simple and lovely.  Looked like something you might find in a Fall floral arrangement. I left them in the pile on the grass and went back to my tasks.

The stopping place was determined. I looked over the yard at the garden beds and received the instant gratification one can get from yard work.  The beds we worked looked much better and the round bed showed a few remaining pieces of mint popping up to catch the afternoon sun.

I finally picked up the small pile of grass I had set aside and decided I thought it was lovely.  I put it in a small vase, created for me by my daughter years ago, and looked for other opportunities for what might be lovely and calm laying in the un neatness scattered all across the front of my house.

There, simply lovely.

Placed in the vase by my chair in my now favorite corner on my porch it provides a calm beauty.

There will always be un neatness on my small acreage and in my gardens but as I’m walking thru it each day I will remember to look for the beauty and calm in the un neatness of it all.

Life can be un neat, messy, full of weeds so it blocks our view of what may be calm and beautiful. Don’t forget to look.

Amazing Fresh Green Beans

Thank you Karen for this simple delicious recipe!!

1 pound fresh green beans
1 medium size onion (your favorite)
2 medium or 1 large tomato (chopped with seeds and all)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar (honey, stevia, etc. Optional)
1 tbsp C & J Farms Dry Ranch Seasoning
1 tbsp Oil

Start by preparing green beans, chop your onion and tomatoes.  Put all of the ingredients in the pot and let cook on medium for about 45 minutes.  No need to add any liquid at all. Cook and enjoy.

 

 

Cinnamon Honey & Immune Booster Tea

Cinnamon Honey SquareImmune system booster tea:

Holy Basil is considered an adaptogenic herb and has pharmacological properties to help your mind cope with many types of stress.   Mint is known for its many digestive benefits. Rosehips are very rich in vitamin C. The Australia lemon myrtle has a high concentration of citral and is rich in antioxidants, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties.

Linden blossoms contain the powerful antioxidants call flavonoids to naturalize free radicals and is native to Europe. Traditionally, the flowers have been used to treat flu, cough, migraine, nervous tension, ingestion, various types of spasms, liver and gall bladder disorders, diarrhea, and elevated arterial pressure associated with arteriosclerosis.

All of these herbs have properties to help boost your immune system.  A healthy immune system helps our bodies to fight off illness.

This is caffeine free.  Having several cups of herbal tea a day is a way to add nutrition but also helps you to slow down and focus on taking a short break.

The flavor is mild and the mint is not overpowering.  We suggest sweetening with our ground Stevia powder (just dried stevia leaves ground up) or our Cinnamon infused honey.  Many of us are enjoying this tea daily. We would like for you to join us in our tea breaks.

About Infused Cinnamon Honey:

Our Infused Cinnamon Honey has the the premium cinnamon from Sri Lanka called Ceylon Cinnamon. The flavor of this cinnamon is a mild warm spice.  It is not hot like the Cassia Cinnamon which is what most of us think of as cinnamon. We enjoy this cinnamon in baking, cooking and in our Greek Seasoning recipe blend.

Studies have shown that Ceylon Cinnamon brings down insulin levels. Ceylon cinnamon contains anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects. These properties mean Ceylon cinnamon supports your immune health.

Raw Honey has antioxidants, anti-bacterial and antifungal properties. The combination presents a lovely indulgent flavor that may be beneficial.  We use this to sweeten our tea, as a glaze on meats (pork especially), in our oatmeal, yogurts, on our squash and sweet potato’s.  Don’t think this is just for tea.  It is a pantry staple to help make your cooking creative in an easy way.

Remember, all honey is sugar, natural but still sugar.

Be sure to talk to your doctor anytime you change up your nutritional habits.

 

https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/basil-benefits

https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/top-raw-honey-benefits

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318386

 

Fall Container Gardens – Hard to Find Medicinal Herbs, Let’s Plant

It is August and is now typically Texas HOT and I’m talking about gardening.  We have just put out a limited amount of beautiful medicinal herb plants to use as container gardening for this fall and winter.  I want to tell you about them.  They are beautiful for container planting, some of them are so fragrant and all of them are helpful.

First let me tell you about the few plants we have in one gallon pots.  They are already of a nice size so put into a lovely pot these are ready to make a statement now.

GYNURA SPINACH – aka longevity spinach. Research shows that it is an efficient regulator of blood sugar.  Leaves eaten in salads or cooked in dishes, may lower blood pressure and cholesterol.

This is a fast growing plant. Is vining in nature but can be cut to bush.  It is a good candidate for growing indoors as it is a tropical. It is easy to grow, just give them lots of light. You can enjoy these leaves raw or cooked. They are very high in protein.  Good for vegetarians to know.
Med - gynura spinach - Copy

WHITE CHRYSANTHEMUM TEA – I am so excited about this plant!! White Chrysanthemum Tea – Chinese Gong Ju Hua Cha, is made form the dried flowers of this plant.  Did you know all Chrysanthemum flowers are edible?  They are!

An evergreen and hardy to 0 degrees. Flowering occurs in the fall in zone 7.  The plant prefers full sun, well drained soils and frequent watering.

The flowers are steeped in hot water and a herbal tea is made.  This is highly medicinal and thought to help reduce inflammation in the body, help with eye problems like – blurred vision, spotty vision, watery eyes and maybe even help with cataracts. May help with high cholesterol, blood pressure and alleviate cold symptoms.
Med - White Chry Tea

CURRY TREE – this smells delightful!!! This is another great container tree.  In a container it will grow about 3’ in height.  It likes to be fed and pruned for a strong bushy plant  Unless you live in zone 9 or higher the container is the way to go.  It can be outside here all summer and then moved indoors for the winter.

The leaves are thick so normally always fried in oil alone before adding any other spices to the dish.  Make a pesto or use on your BBQ.  Experiment with this one.  A beautiful fragrant plant.  A conversation piece for sure.
Med - Curry Tree - Copy

TEA TREE – we are all familiar with Tea Tree Oil, well this is the tree it comes from.

The tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) is a small evergreen that likes warm climates. It is attractive and fragrant, with an exotic look. The oil from the foliage of this tree is widely used.  Melaleuca tea trees attract attention in your garden, with the trunk being one of the most attractive features is the trunk, with its gorgeous, papery bark.  Living here in Texas where it is mostly warm it can be planted in the gardens.  This can also be grown in containers and is a good way to control the rapid growth of this tree. This also ensures its survival. It must have a lot of sunlight.  This is a fast-growing tree.  It takes a few years before you will see the flowers.

It is recommended you don’t plant this tree outside unless you live in a zone 8 or above. The trees need sun, sun, sun.  They will not do well in the shade. Make sure the soil drains easily. These trees like water.  You need to keep that soil a bit moist at all times.

It is an evergreen and can grow 8 to 15 feet and does like the Texas heat.  It is cold hardy to at least 16 degrees.  It is used in products like soap, toothpaste, oils, etc. Anti-fungal/bacterial.
Med - Tea Tree

The following plants I have in 4″ pots.
HIBISCUS “ROSELLE”
Hibiscus Roselle This bushy shrub can grow 4 to 7’ tall in t he ground but is also a good candidate for container growing. Water the soil when it becomes dry to the touch. To reiterate, water only enough to make the soil moist, not wet. It is critical to use the right type of fertilizer. The fertilizer needs to be one with low phosphorus, moderate nitrogen, and high potassium. Fertilize every two to three weeks.

The calyx is harvested and steeped to make a tea.  Hibiscus Roselle tea is reported to lower blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol. This may be worth trying. The beautiful tea is red in color and tastes delicious.  Hibiscus tea does not contain caffeine and is reported to help you relax, making it a good drink for those that are sensitive to caffeine.

ZA’ATAR – this is a wild oregano in Israel. It is in the oregano/thyme family.  This is also called the bible hyssop. This herb can be put into a delicious olive oil to enjoy dipping a fresh crusty bread in. It can be used as an herb in many culinary dishes.  Commonly used in Mediterranean dishes with yogurt, meats and veggies.

TOOTHACHE PLANT – Acmella Oleracea – It has daisy like flowers in the summertime.  It has been used medicinally for a long time. It has been used been used for generations to manage the pain of toothaches. Both the leaves and the attractive golden flowers can be used as a natural anesthetic. Simply chew the leaves or flowers for a few seconds then you’ll experience a tingling and numbing sensation in your mouth. An infusion or tincture made from the Toothache Plant is said to promote gum and throat health due to its strong antibacterial properties. Also called Spilanthes oleracea.

This herb is a good candidate for container growing.  It gets to about 18” tall, fast grower and takes well to pruning.  It needs a lot of light but don’t overwater.  Wait until the soil is dry to the touch then water. Provides pretty yellow flowers. Enjoy this one.
Med - toothache plant - Copy

ST. JOHNS WORT – This plant is widely known as an herbal treatment for depression. Research indicates St. John’s wort is most often used as a dietary supplement for depression. People also use it as a dietary supplement for other conditions, including menopausal symptoms, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and obsessive-disorder. It is used topically for wound healing.  The flowering tops of St. John’s wort are used to prepare teas, tablets, capsules, and liquid extracts. Topical preparations are also available.  This plant likes a lot of water. Is a small shruby plant.

Easy to grow it is not too particular.  Gets to about 3’ tall and provides yellow flowers in the  summer time.
Med - St Johns - Copy

HOLY BASIL, RAMA TULSI – We have two types of Holy Basil – Rama Tulsi – True Holy Basel, held sacred by the Hindus.  Enjoy in tea, cooking, and salads. Both of the Holy Basil (Tulsi) have a delightful fragrance.  I enjoy them very much for that one benefit alone.  They have been very easy for me to grow and will be a delight to have in your indoor herb garden.

It has been used in Ayurveda medicine for generations. This variety has been found to be one of the highest in medicinal compounds; adaptogenic, antifungal, antibacterial and immune enhancing. Enjoy a tea, tincture, extract or syrup.
Med - Holy basil rama.jpg

HOLY BASIL, KRISHNA TULSI – It acts like an annual, and is even known to self-seed in temperate climates, which is quite unusual for basil.  Eat one fresh leaf daily, or pick the leaves and flowers and dry them and make the tea. Most excellent. Adaptogenic, immune enhancing, antifungal and antibacterial.

This is easiest of all Tulsi types to grow in temperate gardens and is highly aromatic. Enjoy this too in your kitchen herb garden.  Enjoy this in your kitchen garden in the winter and set out on your porch the rest of the year.  Keep the flowers cut for a bushier plant with a lot more foliage.

Come out and get these hard to find plants and have them for this fall and winter.

 

 

 

SLOW COOKER HAWAIIAN LUAU PORK WITH PINEAPPLE CILANTRO RICE

Prep Time: 1 minutes

Cook Time: 1 day

Total Time: 1 day 1 minute

 

Ingredients:

1 5-6 pound bone in pork shoulder

2 tablespoons C&J Farms Pink Himalayan Pink Salt

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

 

Rice:
4 cups rice
1 bunch of cilantro
1 pineapple
¼ tsp C&J Farms roasted garlic salt

 

Instructions:

  1. Put pork in the slow cooker, fattier side up.
  2. Season with salt all over.
  3. Add Worcestershire sauce on top.
  4. Cover and cook on low for 24 hours.
  5. DO NOT ADD any water.
  6. If you aren’t going to be eating it right away, try and remove it in one piece after it cools and store in a pot with the cooking liquid.
  7. Heat gently in a 300 degree oven.
  8. Discard fatty liquid before serving.

 

Rice:

  1. Cook rice
  2. Prep and chop pineapple finely
  3. Chop cilantro
  4. Add pineapple and cilantro to cooked rice

 

Serve pork over a bed of rice.

Greek Eggs

This morning it was C & J Farms Greek Seasoning for breakfast.  Chop up 1/2 cup of bell pepper (I used yellow), 1/2 cup of red onion and 1/2 up of tomatoes.  Get your eggs ready. I show four eggs but actually used 5 so my husband and I could share. Grab the Greek Seasoning and some Feta cheese.Greek eggs 1I put all of this in a skillet with 1 tablespoon of butter and simmer until soft.  GARLIC – I almost forgot the garlic.  Chop up 1 large clove and add to veggies simmering.

Greek eggs 5

Mix your eggs and add 1/4 teaspoon of the Greek Seasoning to your eggs. You can add more go by your taste.

Greek eggs 2

Greek eggs 3

Once the veggies are soft add in the eggs to the skillet and stir until cooked through.  Add a little bit of Feta right before the eggs finish. Then plate.

Greek eggs 6Finish by adding Feta cheese, chopped tomatoes and some C & J Farms fresh dried parsley.

Enjoy!!