Fertilizing with items from home/free.

Natural and Mostly Free Fertilizers

It’s Spring so we have a lot of garden work to do.  During the winter months, I was thinking about gardening, of course.  I began to research How to Fertilize your garden naturally and found a lot of good information.  Growing our herbs and veggies as naturally and organically as possible is what many of us want.  This might help you too.

Plants need three things to survive and thrive: Potassium, Phosphorus, and Nitrogen. While store bought chemical fertilizers typically have these nutrients, you can also provide them to your plants without the harsh chemicals by just making them yourself, and most of them can be made with things that you already have on hand and will probably just throw out.

There are many different all-natural fertilizers that you can use in your garden or with potting soil. Some of these fertilizers can be made or collected at home using common items from your pantry or your backyard. 

So here we go…..

1. Grass Clippings

If you haven’t had chemicals on your lawn you can collect your grass clippings to use on your gardens. Half an inch to an inch of grass clippings makes a great weed-blocking mulch, and it is also rich in nitrogen, which is an essential nutrient for most plants.

You can also add clippings to your compost pile.

Composting involves mixing grass clippings and other plant materials with a small amount of soil containing microorganisms that decompose organic matter. Grass clippings are excellent additions to a compost pile because of their high nitrogen content.

Grass clippings should not be the only compost material. As with mulches, a thick layer of grass clippings in a compost pile will lead to bad odors from anaerobic decomposition. Mix them with dry materials such as leaves or straw.

2. Weeds

Just like grass clippings, many of the weeds that you’ll find in your gardens are very high in nitrogen and will make an excellent fertilizer. The problem is, once you’ve pulled the weeds, you certainly won’t want to put them back in the garden because any seeds will sprout and make new weeds. The solution? Make weed tea. To do this, fill a five-gallon bucket no more than 1/4 full with weeds that you’ve pulled. Then fill the bucket the rest of the way with water, and let the weeds soak for a week or two. Once the water turns nice and brown (like tea), pour this weed tea on your gardens.

3. Kitchen Scraps

Put your kitchen scraps to work.  I keep a baggie (there are commercial scrap holders on the market) and put my veggie and fruit wastes in the baggie.  I typically have a mesh cone in my raised beds to add the kitchen scraps to regularly.  They decompose adding nutrients constantly.

4. Manure

This is one of my favorites.  Sometimes we have available manure on the farm, but I have also purchased rabbit manure in bulk from breeders.  You can find manure for sale. The rabbit manure is not hot. So this can be used immediately.

Manure comes from a variety of sources — cows, horses, chickens, and even bats. Each type of manure is high in nitrogen and other nutrients, but you’ll need to use it carefully. Raw manure is highly acidic and may have more nutrients than your plants need, so too much can burn your plants. It’s best to use composted manure. Since it is less nutrient-dense and acidic, you can use more of it to improve your soil’s water retention without risking your plants. You won’t have to wait long—manure quickly turns to a perfect odor-free soil amendment.

Manure has been used for centuries as well for fertilizing and you can use manure from any farm animal that you may have. If you don’t have farm animals, your neighbors will probably be glad to give you some manure from their animals. You can make a manure tea.  You’ll want a shovel full and the manure should be pretty well aged, so nothing from the same day that you plan to make the tea. Put the manure in a pillowcase or burlap sack and then soak the bag in a five gallon bucket of water for about two weeks. Just dilute the tea with water by half and use it to water your plants. Not only does this help to add essential nutrients, you also get the benefits of manure without actually having to smell fresh manure on your plants.

5. Tree Leaves

Rather than bagging up the fall leaves and putting them out on your curb, collect them for your gardens instead. Leaves are rich with trace minerals, they attract earthworms, they retain moisture, and they’ll help make heavy soils lighter. You can use leaves in two ways: Either till them into your soil (or mix crushed leaves into potting soil), or use them as a mulch to both fertilize your plants and keep weeds down.

In our gardens I always let the leaves from the fall stay in my gardens until spring.  They are the perfect mulch protector over the winter.

6. Coffee Grounds – adds nitrogen adding acidity to the soil

Lots of plants, such as blueberries, rhododendron, roses, and tomatoes, thrive best in acidic soil. Here are other plants that will benefit – veggies, hydrangea, magnolias. Recycle your coffee grounds to help acidify your soil. There are a couple of ways to do this— you can either top dress by sprinkling the used grounds over the surface of the soil this will perk those plants right up. or you can make “coffee” or “coffee tea” to pour on your gardens. Soak up to six cups of used coffee grounds for up to a week to make garden coffee, then use it to water your acid-loving plants.

7. Eggshells

If you’ve ever used lime on your garden, then you know it comes with lots of benefits —  it helps  lower the acidity of soil for plants that don’t like acid, and it provides plants with lots of calcium, which is an essential nutrient. Lime itself is an all-natural fertilizer that you can buy at the garden center, but if you’d rather save some money, there is a cheaper way to get the same benefits. Simply wash out the eggshells from your kitchen, save them, and crush them to use in your garden. It turns out that eggshells are 93% calcium carbonate, which is the scientific name for lime.

The shells contain a lot of calcium which helps with cellular growth in your plants. Calcium deficient soil can lead to blossom end rot on tomatoes and various other garden catastrophes. This egg shell fertilizer will help to end that. Just crush up used egg shells and then bury them in the soil. Or, you can make a spray with egg shells and a gallon of water. Boil the shells in the water for just a few minutes and then leave overnight. Strain the shells and add the water to a spray bottle to spray directly onto your soil.

8. Banana Peels

We eat bananas for their potassium, and roses love potassium too. Simply bury peels in a hole alongside the rose bush so they can compost naturally. As the rose grows, bury the peels into the soil’s top layer. Both of these approaches will provide much-needed potassium for the plant’s proper growth

We all know that bananas are rich in potassium. They also contain calcium and phosphorous and are perfect for fertilizing flowering plants, fruit trees and plants. You can just bury banana peels in the soil at the base of your plants and allow them to decompose. You could also freeze your overripe bananas and then bury those next to your plants. Or, make a spray by soaking banana peels in water for three days and then spray your plants or seedlings to add the needed nutrients. This is also a great recipe for houseplants.

9. Comfrey

What is brilliant about comfrey is that it contains high levels of all the essential nutrients for plant growth: Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium (NPK) together with many other trace elements.  Comfrey out-performs manure, compost and many liquid feeds for concentration of nutrients.  It produces these from a deep root system extending right into the subsoil that most edible plants cannot access.  It also has an ideal Carbon:Nitrogen ratio which means that it does not hamper absorption of nitrogen by plants. When cutting comfrey it is advisable to use gloves as the hairs on the stems can irritate skin.

There are many great ways to use comfrey around the garden:

  • Mulch: Leaves can be cut and left to wilt for a couple of days before piling them around hungry plants such as potatoes and tomatoes as a thick mulch.
  • Dig in: Wilted leaves can be dug into ground that is being prepared for a new crop and will break down to give an excellent feed.
  • Liquid Fertilizer: Comfrey leaves can be crammed into a large container with a hole in the bottom with a small container underneath to catch the thick black liquid which will be produced in a few weeks.  Weighing the comfrey down with an old brick will help this process and some people add rainwater but this does make the resulting ‘comfrey tea’ smell awful!  Once produced, the liquid should be diluted 15:1 with water before using it as a leaf feed for plants such as tomatoes.
  •   Potting Soil: Comfrey leaves can be shredded and mixed with leaf-mold to produce a balanced soil for plants in pots, although it is a little strong for young seedlings.
  •   Compost Activator: Adding high-nitrogen sources is a great way to boost ‘hot-composting’ if you have the right balance of green and brown shredded material.  Comfrey, being high in nitrogen, is ideal for this and should be well combined with the whole mixture rather than adding it as a layer.

I grow comfrey, which is a beautiful perennial plant with lovely flowers, and always use the waste from the dead leaves in the fall in my gardens.  The medicinal benefits are fantastic too!

10. Epsom Salt

If you prefer something a bit simple you can mix Epsom Salt with water for a good fertilizer, too. You can find Epsom salt at many stores and it’s really inexpensive. It’s also a great source of magnesium and sulfur and is especially good for roses and tomatoes. This is a no-fail fertilizer. You just can’t get this one wrong. Just add a tablespoon of salt to a gallon of water and use this to feed your indoor and outdoor plants.

11. Aquarium Water

Aquarium water contains (obviously) fish waste from the bottom of the tank, which makes a great plant fertilizer. So instead of throwing that water out the backdoor when you’re cleaning your aquarium, give it to your garden plants. Just be sure you use “fresh” water and not water from a saltwater tank. That would be BAD…really bad. Also be aware of the smell and stick to using this on your ornamental outdoor plants. For veggie gardeners willing to spend a small amount, there’s a commercial product called fish emulsion that’s extremely effective and affordable as well. Then again, you could always go fishing! Another favorite of mine!! I do use the fish emulsion and have great success.

12. Wood Ash

Wood ash from fireplaces makes a great plant food on the cheap. Wood ashes contain potassium and calcium carbonate so it would make a nice option, which you can apply by simply having it sprinkled onto your soil. Just be sure the ashes that you’ll be using have no charcoal or lighter fluid which can be harmful to your plants. Fireplace ash fertilizer can even jolt your grass back to life. If you have a few spots dying out, simply apply a small bit.

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Seriously, Best Ever Roasted Chicken

My husband has made the best roasted chicken I have ever had for the last 20 years. I have enjoyed it so much and requested it many times. Since he was doing the cooking I always took advantage and not been in the kitchen while he was preparing my favorite dish.

Well, on Sunday I asked my husband if he would make it for me and let me get the recipe. 🙂

I am going to share it with you. You will love it!

The things you will need. Roasting pan. Whole chicken. Chicken broth. C & J Farms Scarborough Fair Seasoning (you can use Dry Ranch as an option), C & J Farms Sea Salt & Pepper, 2 Sticks of butter, 1 box Stove Top Stuffing – Savory Herb, 1 box Cornbread Stove Top Stuffing, meat thermometer.

Set your oven to 375 degrees.

Wash you chicken well inside and out. Take 1 1/2 tablespoon of Salt & Pepper and slather the inside of the chicken and some on the outside of the chicken. Then add 1 1/2 tablespoons of the Seasoning, Scarborough Fair or Dry Ranch and slather the inside of chicken again. Take about 1 1/2 tablespoons of the seasoning and rub on the outside of the chicken.

Add the content of boxes of dressing in a bowl and mix together. Add the box of chicken broth. Let it sit until the broth is absorbed by the dressing mix.

At this time you can prepare any veggies you may be adding to the roasting pan with the chicken.

Once the broth is absorbed, mix the dressing and stuff as much as you can inside the chicken. You can let some spill out into the pan. Then add 1 entire stick of butter to the inside of the chicken. Yep, just stuff it in there. The entire stick. 🙂

Then add a little water to the bottom of the roasting pan (about and inch in the bottom).

Now cover the chicken and put in the oven for a couple of hours. Begin to check internal temperature of chicken. Once the chicken reaches 190 degrees it is done. Take the other stick of butter and slather it on top of the outside of the chicken. You will probably use about 1/3 of it. Leaving it uncovered to crisp and brown the outside skin of the chicken return it to the oven for another 20 to 30 minutes.

Once browned and temp is right, it is ready to be enjoyed. This is an exceptionally moist and juicy chicken on the inside and crispy on the outside.

Now, my husband cooks this for two people. There are always leftovers which makes me very happy!! I will type up one of the recipes I make out of the leftovers later. The entire family will love it too. For now, try this and I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Look at the top image really well. You can see how moist the chicken is. I wanted to get a picture of it coming out of the oven but my husband wasn’t aware of that and I missed that beautiful roasted bird.

The Un Neatness of it All

It is Fall. Here in Texas the weather this year is untypically Fall like. Cool nights in the 50’s with highs in the mid to low 70’s, enjoyable and unusual for us.  Typically, the temperatures go from HOT to cold without much in between, like fall weather.

My garden beds have been in great need of cleaning out for a couple of months now. (I like a clean and tidy house.  I also like my beds and yard to be neat and tidy.)  When I let the clean out of the gardens go (like I have for months) it feels untidy and like I need to clean house.  So, with the help of my husband we set out to clean out some garden beds.

I started in the round garden bed that is directly in front of the porch we sit on every day.  We enjoy sitting on the porch chatting at the end of our day, relaxing.  This round bed was atrocious. Grass was 2 feet high overwhelming the mint that was trying to come back now that the weather has cooled off. I was pulling and digging out the roots that run underground.  We trimmed hedges, cleaned out weeds, raked, pulled and picked up for hours.

As I was cleaning the round bed I began to wonder “Can there be beauty or calm in the un neatness of it all?” The un neatness of it all……. 

As I was looking at the tall grass I was pulling and tossing to the side; I saw some light colored fuzzy soft looking ends on some of the grass. I became curious and had to take a break and see if I could work some of that fuzzy soft looking grass heads out away from the other burn pile bound stack of garden debris.

Someone described me as tenacious one time and I have to say, that I am.  I sat on the damp ground and carefully worked out the grass heads and stems until I had a small pile of them.  Taken away from all of the other un neatness, I thought these were simple and lovely.  Looked like something you might find in a Fall floral arrangement. I left them in the pile on the grass and went back to my tasks.

The stopping place was determined. I looked over the yard at the garden beds and received the instant gratification one can get from yard work.  The beds we worked looked much better and the round bed showed a few remaining pieces of mint popping up to catch the afternoon sun.

I finally picked up the small pile of grass I had set aside and decided I thought it was lovely.  I put it in a small vase, created for me by my daughter years ago, and looked for other opportunities for what might be lovely and calm laying in the un neatness scattered all across the front of my house.

There, simply lovely.

Placed in the vase by my chair in my now favorite corner on my porch it provides a calm beauty.

There will always be un neatness on my small acreage and in my gardens but as I’m walking thru it each day I will remember to look for the beauty and calm in the un neatness of it all.

Life can be un neat, messy, full of weeds so it blocks our view of what may be calm and beautiful. Don’t forget to look.

Smokey Spicy Chicken Tetrazzini

This is a great one pan dinner. You can make it in advance too.

Ingredients:
2 cups cooked chicken chopped ( I always use more chicken)
1 8 oz package of noodles ( I use whatever I have. This time it was Farfalle)
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped bell pepper
1 cup chopped celery
1/4 cup butter
1 tbls C & J Farms Applewood/ Jalapeno Seasoning/Salt
1 tsp C & J Farms Smoked paprika
3 tsp flour
2 cups milk or (1 cup milk & 1 cup chicken broth)
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1/2 cup sharp cheddar cheese grated
To Top Casserole:
1/4 cup bread crumbs
1/4 cup grated cheese

Cook noodles according to package directions. Saute’ onions, bell pepper and celery in butter. Stir in flower slowly and cook until thick, then add seasonings and 1/2 cup of cheese and stir until melted.
Add 2 cups milk, mushroom soup and chopped chicken and noodles.
Turn into a shallow baking dish nd cover with crumb topping and cheese.
Bake at 400 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes or until brown and bubbly.

Banana, Pancakes, Autumn Spice

I had very ripe bananas this morning when I got ready to make some breakfast.  I decided to make one of my favorite things, Banana Pancakes.

Make your pancake batter as you normally do.  If it is from scratch or mix it doesn’t matter.  All you are going to do is add some very ripe bananas.  I made a standard amount of pancake batter for a family of 4.

Mash up 2 ripe bananas.  Once well mashed add them into your batter.  Then add C & J Farms 1 to 2 Tablespoons of Autumn Spice Blend.  Mix until well incorporated.  Cook as normal.

This is so yummy as it is but would be amazing with our new Chocolate Honey on top.

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Amazing Fresh Green Beans

Thank you Karen for this simple delicious recipe!!

1 pound fresh green beans
1 medium size onion (your favorite)
2 medium or 1 large tomato (chopped with seeds and all)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar (honey, stevia, etc. Optional)
1 tbsp C & J Farms Dry Ranch Seasoning
1 tbsp Oil

Start by preparing green beans, chop your onion and tomatoes.  Put all of the ingredients in the pot and let cook on medium for about 45 minutes.  No need to add any liquid at all. Cook and enjoy.

 

 

It’s Time for Thyme

Thyme is an herb we take for granted.  We add it liberally to our sauces, chicken, soups and more as a culinary staple but this is an herb we can turn to time and again for help.

If you like to grow things thyme is a very easy herb to grow.  You can put it in pots or garden spaces as borders.  This plant (here in Texas) stays green year round.  Our Texas summers push the plant back a bit in the heat of the year but it bounces back as soon as the weather begins to cool down.  So plant it once and have it for a long time.

During this challenging time in our world today, many of us are looking for ways to boost our immune systems and help us to stay well.  So, it’s time we looked at Thyme.

Did you know thyme supports lung health?  It also has many other therapeutic properties.  First, this herb is considered beneficial for coughs, colds, respiratory issues, bronchitis, promoting breathing and help to break up phlegm.  It is also thought to strengthen the lungs.

* Cough

Thyme has long been used as a home remedy for cough, bronchitis, and other respiratory conditions. It is sometimes taken orally to treat a chest infection or inhaled to open airways. There is some clinical evidence of these effects.

According to a 2013 study in the European Respiratory Journal, thymol acts on receptors on the tongue, mouth, throat, and nasal passages in a way that may suppress coughs.

The study involved 18 volunteers, each of whom was exposed to cough stimuli. After using a thymol nasal spray, they underwent several tests to evaluate the urge to cough, the number of coughs experienced, and the threshold by which coughs occurred.

While the nasal spray had no effect on the cough threshold (the point where coughs occur in response to stimuli), it significantly reduced the number and severity of coughs as well as the overall urge to cough. The users reported that the spray had a pleasant cooling effect.

You can find much information on this herb. Here is a list of a few more things it is said to help:  Atopic Dermoatitis, Intestinal Infections, and Menstrual Cramps.

Personally, I have used thyme as a gargle for sore throats and it worked so much and so quickly.  I keep this growing and on hand dried all of the time.  We hope you do your own research.  For us – it’s always time for Thyme.

Click here to take advantage our our special, 10% off of any bulk herbs.  Type in this code:  Justbc at checkout to receive the special.  This offer will be good thru July 15th.

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*this information came from VeryWellHealth.com

This is for information purposes only.  Always talk with your doctor before you add herbs in a medicinal way to your diet and always do your own research.

 

This Herb May Help a Cough, Congestion

Mullein is a common weed prominent all over the United States, often found along stretches of the highway, on the edges of forests and on the gravely sides of railroad tracks. But this plant is much more than a bit of roadside greenery, as it may assist in the recovery of several common conditions within it its fuzzy, pale green leaves and yellow rosettes. Originally used by the natives in several parts of the United States, this plant is still used because of its, beneficial effects on the respiratory system. Assisting with common ailments such as coughing, lung weakness, respiratory constriction and chest colds, the mullein plant is truly a lung healing herb.

Known as Verbascum thapsus, its Latin name, mullein is considered beneficial for the lungs because it is an expectorant. This means that the herb may help the body remove excess mucus from lungs and soothes the mucus membranes with its emollient properties. It is therefore excellent for helping with the relief of bronchitis, heavy coughing, chest colds and even asthma. Both the leaves and the flowers of the plant contain saponins, natural detergents which make a cough more productive in releasing and expelling phlegm from the walls of the lungs, and mucilage, a gelatinous substance which soothes any irritated membrane.

The herb is also a diuretic and thus can relieve urinary tract inflammation when taken through a tea. It can also be used to decrease inflammation in the bowels, helping to reduce colitis and other issues.

A Mullein Tea Recipe
Ingredients
1 ½ cups boiling water
1-2 teaspoons dried mullein leaves and/or flowers (flowers make a sweeter tea)
1 teaspoon dried spearmint (optional for flavor)
1-2 teaspoons honey (optional)

Method
Steep the mullein leaves in hot water inside a tea ball or strainer for 15 minutes. Add honey if you like a sweeter tea.

Other Ways to Use this Herb:
Mullein extract infused with olive oil has been used to reduce the inflammation of earaches, sore joints, insect bites and hemorrhoids because of its soothing properties.

Simple poultices made out of fresh, mashed mullein and flowers mixed with water can also be used to relieve, burns, boils and sores.

Notes to Know:
Native Americans and the Amish smoked the dried leaves to relax the lungs when respiratory coughing was uncontrollable, or breathing became too difficult. Often just making a smudge of the leaves would suffice.

If you decide to make your own concoctions from mullein, which is easy to do, make sure that you strain all your product through a very fine sieve to remove the hairs from the leaves. These hairs are what most people find irritating if they have allergies.

Mullein must always be heated thoroughly before being ingested due to the saponins which are rather toxic. After being heated, mullein is fine for humans.

This is for information only.  Though this herb has been used for centuries.

A study: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/308991417_Assessing_the_Effectiveness_of_Mullein_on_Respiratory_Conditions_Such_as_Asthma

https://www.organicauthority.com/health/mullein-herbal-tea

Echinacea, the Coneflower, the Herb

Echinacea is a very popular herb but what does it do?

People who use this herb regularly says it helps your immune system to fight against colds and flu.

All species of this herbal remedy have compounds called phenols. Many plants contain phenols, active substances that control the activity of a range of enzymes and cell receptors, and protect the plant from infections and ultraviolet (UV) radiation damage. Phenols have antioxidant properties, which may be good for human health.

Echinacea also contains alkylamides or alkamides, (not in Echinacea pallida), which have an effect on the immune system, as well as polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and caffeic acid derivatives.  Several species of the echinacea plant are used to make medicine from its leaves, flower, and root. Echinacea was used in traditional herbal remedies by the Great Plains Indian tribes.

Echinacea also seems to contain some chemicals that can attack yeast and other kinds of fungi directly.

Making Echinacea tea is simple.  You can purchase Echinacea roots and leaves at  https://www.cjfarmstexas.com/echinacea-roots-and-leaves.  

  • Measure out two teaspoons into an empty tea bag or your favorite tea diffuser.
  • Bring water to a boil then let the herb steep for up to 20 minutes. Drink cold or hot.
  • Add local honey for a super-immune boost and enjoy. Texas Raw Honey

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-981/echinacea
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/252684
https://www.healthline.com/health/echinacea-tea-benefits#diy

 

Cinnamon Honey & Immune Booster Tea

Cinnamon Honey SquareImmune system booster tea:

Holy Basil is considered an adaptogenic herb and has pharmacological properties to help your mind cope with many types of stress.   Mint is known for its many digestive benefits. Rosehips are very rich in vitamin C. The Australia lemon myrtle has a high concentration of citral and is rich in antioxidants, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties.

Linden blossoms contain the powerful antioxidants call flavonoids to naturalize free radicals and is native to Europe. Traditionally, the flowers have been used to treat flu, cough, migraine, nervous tension, ingestion, various types of spasms, liver and gall bladder disorders, diarrhea, and elevated arterial pressure associated with arteriosclerosis.

All of these herbs have properties to help boost your immune system.  A healthy immune system helps our bodies to fight off illness.

This is caffeine free.  Having several cups of herbal tea a day is a way to add nutrition but also helps you to slow down and focus on taking a short break.

The flavor is mild and the mint is not overpowering.  We suggest sweetening with our ground Stevia powder (just dried stevia leaves ground up) or our Cinnamon infused honey.  Many of us are enjoying this tea daily. We would like for you to join us in our tea breaks.

About Infused Cinnamon Honey:

Our Infused Cinnamon Honey has the the premium cinnamon from Sri Lanka called Ceylon Cinnamon. The flavor of this cinnamon is a mild warm spice.  It is not hot like the Cassia Cinnamon which is what most of us think of as cinnamon. We enjoy this cinnamon in baking, cooking and in our Greek Seasoning recipe blend.

Studies have shown that Ceylon Cinnamon brings down insulin levels. Ceylon cinnamon contains anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects. These properties mean Ceylon cinnamon supports your immune health.

Raw Honey has antioxidants, anti-bacterial and antifungal properties. The combination presents a lovely indulgent flavor that may be beneficial.  We use this to sweeten our tea, as a glaze on meats (pork especially), in our oatmeal, yogurts, on our squash and sweet potato’s.  Don’t think this is just for tea.  It is a pantry staple to help make your cooking creative in an easy way.

Remember, all honey is sugar, natural but still sugar.

Be sure to talk to your doctor anytime you change up your nutritional habits.

 

https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/basil-benefits

https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/top-raw-honey-benefits

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318386